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JOSEPHINE COUNTY JAIL
 
March 3, 2016; Updated April 2016
 
This web page was started because of the 2006 publication, JoCo Jail "Cap" - Figures That Don’t Add Up, by Gil Gilbertson, Josephine County Sheriff Candidate.  Sheriff Gilbertson was elected January 2007.  He served two terms until January 2015.
 
JoCo Jail "Cap" is a powerful query and recommendation.  The JS&PSS Exploratory Committee does not understand all the concepts in the 2006 paper, nor whether Sheriff Gilbertson followed through with his recommendations.
 
(Very Draft March 26, 2016 Outline - It will evolve with research.)
 
I. JOCO JAIL "CAP" - FIGURES THAT DON'T ADD UP
     A.  Oregon Revised Statute 169.042 thru 046
     B.  JOCO Court ORDER No. 2003-023/Minutes Of Meeting
     C.  Court Orders On Prevailing Constitutional Standards Relating To Conditions Of Incarceratio?
 
II. JAIL RATIO OF 1 DEPUTY TO 5 INMATES
    A. Old Antiquated Jail:   2003
        1.    Square Footage of Jail Space
        2.    Safety Features
    B. New State-of-the-Art Jail:   2000 - 2016
        1.    Square Footage of Jail Space
        2.    Safety Features
        3. Jail Capacity Limit & Action Plan Under ORS 169.044
    C. Formulas
 
III. OREGON COUNTIES COMPARISON
     A. Staff/Inmate Ratios In Jails
     B. Jail Staffing Analysis
     C. Yamhill County (Oregon) Case Example
 
IV. STAFF/INMATE RATIOS IN JAILS (April 2015)
     A. Staff/Inmate Ratios in Jails, National Institute Of Correction ( 2015)
     B. Other Staff/Inmate Ratio References
 
V.  JAIL STAFFING ANALYSIS
 
VI. OREGON SHERIFF JAIL COMMAND COUNCIL
     A. Oregon Counties: FY 2006-07 - FY 2014-15
     B. Josephine County, Oregon: FY 2006-07 - FY 2014-15
 
VII. ADULT JAIL
 
JOSEPHINE COUNTY ADULT JAIL, JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON ADOPTED BUDGET FY 2015-16
     • Josephine County (JO CO) Board of County Commissioners (BCC). June 17, 2015. Josephine County, Oregon Adopted Budget FY
     2015-16. JO CO BCC Resolution Number 2015-026. Grants Pass, OR.
 
VIII. RESOURCES
     A. Professional Resources
         1. Oregon State Sheriff's Association (OSSA)
         2. Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Center
     B. Studies/Papers
         1. Jackson County, Oregon Special Corrections Grand Jury Reports
         2. Executive Office of the President of the United States
 
JOSEPHINE COUNTY JAIL
 
I. JOCO JAIL "CAP" - FIGURES THAT DON'T ADD
 
JoCo Jail "Cap" Figures That Don’t Add Up
US Observer
March 2006
http://www.usobserver.com/archive/mar-06/jail-cap.html
 
By Gil Gilbertson
Josephine County Sheriff Candidate
 
Out of 36 counties in Oregon, we are the only one to restrict the number of prisoners incarcerated at a number less than full capacity. We are filling only 120 beds of our 262-bed jail and releasing up to 75 felons each month. The Board of Commissioners, under direction of the Sheriff, proclaimed a ratio of 1 deputy to 5 inmates as an absolute. (emphasis added)  Using this logic, we could have saved ourselves a lot of money by not building the new jail. (emphasis added)   In 2003, a recommendation presented to our "then" county commissioners proposed a limit on the number of inmates incarcerated in our jail. The Board of Commissioners adopted the recommendations made by the Sheriff, agreed upon by the District Attorney, and Legal Counsel in compliance with Oregon law. See Oregon Revised Statute 169.042 thru 046, and JOCO Court ORDER No. 2003-023. (emphasis added)
 
In reviewing the minutes of that meeting, (emphasis added) it became apparent the "stated" premise of the ratio of 1 deputy per 5 inmates (emphasis added) was based on square footage of jail space in the antiquated jail (emphasis added) located in the basement of the county court house.  This same formula (emphasis added) was applied to our new state-of-the-art jail (emphasis added) without consideration of all the safety features (emphasis added) included.
 
How does one determine the number of deputies required to operate our jail? A member of the National Sheriff Association Executive Board recently told me, "There is no magic formula because every jail is different." (emphasis added)
 
Based on my experience and carefully researching the issue I believe we need to re-examine the logic behind imposing such a limit and the need of our current "emergency release" program. Releasing criminals back into our community is certainly depressing – not to mention putting our citizens’ safety and well-being at risk. What deterrent remains to abate further criminal activity? Unfortunately, recent studies cited by the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office Resource Analysis Unit show that it is evident an increase in crimes closely parallels the early release of inmates.
 
I cast absolutely no aspersions on the dedicated and professional correction deputies working hard to maintain safety in our community – but rather, identify a problem within the control of our current sheriff administration, and offer additional information for their reconsideration on this issue.
The safety of our inmates and deputies is extremely important. With this in mind, special features were included in the design of our modern jail. Our facility was compartmentalized with smaller rooms (called "pods") separating the number of inmates into smaller, more manageable groups. In addition, other security features such as cameras, electronically controlled doors and controlled movement of personnel are utilized.
 
With proper supervision, protocols, training, rehearsed emergency drills, and better use of available resources, crisis encounters are diminished, if not eliminated. If overcrowding ever becomes problematic within a common room in the facility, one could employ a simple time-sharing schedule. In my opinion, the preceding conditions should determine the number of positions (posts) required to staff a jail. Further, multiply the number of positions by the shifts – add a standard formula to determine labor relief and you identify the number of personnel needed. (emphasis added)
 
Understandably, the sheriff does not wish to see a reduction in the work force – nor should the residents of this county. The citizens of JOCO should demand more, not less, full-time professional deputies for obvious reasons. However, until we can afford them, there are other temporary resources available, but seemingly, the current sheriff’s administration refuses to engage them.
 
Yamhill County (Oregon) is a classic example of what an efficient and professionally managed jail can do. Although this county is 55% smaller in area than Josephine, with a population of approximately 10,000 more citizens, and has a budget comparable to ours, Sheriff Crabtree has two fewer corrections deputies, yet continually fills his older, less efficient 250-bed jail to full capacity. Why can we not do better with our state-of-the-art facility? (emphasis added)
 
I submit the following for review – Commissioners: (1) review the need for having a "cap" using the criteria prescribed by law, (2) since the county is self-insured, determine what impact this may have, if any, on our liability, and (3) require a realistic assessment of the situation, and (4) Adjust accordingly. In addition, the Sheriff’s office should, (1) develop a strategy whereby Josephine County can manage their inmates similar to what the other 35 counties do – emulate the demonstrated successes throughout the state, (2) better utilize available resources, and (3) use prudent judgment relative to early release of inmates back into our community.
 
I believe we can resolve this "self-imposed" dilemma. Solutions are as plain as day – with proper management this issue can be turned around and our community will be safer for doing so. After all, of the 36 counties in Oregon, why are we the only one that cannot get it right – we certainly are not the only county concerned with "safety, or the only county dealing with reduced available dollars."
 
Gil Gilbertson may be reached at: [2006]
541-955-4697
117 NW G St., Grants Pass
or gil@gilgilbertson.com
 
A.  Oregon Revised Statute 169.042 thru 046
 
Chapter 169 Local and Regional Correctional Facilities; Prisoners; Juvenile Facilities
http://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/chapter/169
Downloaded March 14, 2016
 
ORS 169.042 Maximum facility population
ORS 169.044 Action on recommendation
ORS 169.046 Notice of county jail population emergency
 
Local Correctional Facilities
ORS 169.030 Construction, maintenance and use of local correctional facilities by county and city
ORS 169.040 Inspection of local correctional facilities
ORS 169.042 Maximum facility population
ORS 169.044 Action on recommendation
ORS 169.046 Notice of county jail population emergency
ORS 169.050 Contracts for boarding of prisoners
ORS 169.053 Agreements with other counties or Department of Corrections for confinement and detention of offenders
ORS 169.055 Contracts with Department of Corrections for county prisoners awaiting sentencing
 
ORS 169.042 Maximum Facility Population
 
• recommendation
 
The county court or board of commissioners of a county may institute an examination of the countys local correctional facility for the purpose of obtaining a recommendation regarding the maximum number of inmates that should be held in the facility. This recommendation shall be based on consideration of the following:
(1) The advice of the district attorney, county counsel and sheriff concerning prevailing constitutional standards relating to conditions of incarceration;
(2) The design capacity of the local correctional facility;
(3) The physical condition of the local correctional facility; and
(4) The programs provided for inmates of the local correctional facility. [1989 c.884 2]
 
Annotations
Chapter 169
Law Review Citations
53 OLR 32 (1973)
 
1. Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 169—Local and Regional Correctional Facilities; Prisoners; Juvenile Facilities, https://-www.-oregonlegislature.-gov/-bills_laws/-lawsstatutes/-2013ors169.-html External_link_icon(2013) (last ac-cessed Apr. 27, 2014).
 
ORS 169.044 Action on recommendation
 
When the county court or board has received a recommendation pursuant to ORS 169.042 (Maximum facility population), it shall either:
(1) Reject the recommendation and decline to adopt a limit on the number of inmates that may be held in the local correctional facility; or
(2) Adopt the recommendation and, after consultation with the officials listed in ORS 169.046 (Notice of county jail population emergency) (1), issue an order establishing the maximum allowable number of inmates that may be held in the local correctional facility. This shall include specific standards for determining a county jail population emergency and a specific plan for resolving the emergency. [1989 c.884 3]
 
Annotations
Chapter 169
Law Review Citations
53 OLR 32 (1973)
 
1. Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 169—Local and Regional Correctional Facilities; Prisoners; Juvenile Facilities, https://-www.-oregonlegislature.-gov/-bills_laws/-lawsstatutes/-2013ors169.-html External_link_icon(2013) (last ac-cessed Apr. 27, 2014).
 
ORS 169.046 Notice of county jail population emergency
 
• action to be taken
• notification if release of inmates likely
• forced release
 
(1) If a county court or board adopts a jail capacity limit under ORS 169.044 (Action on recommendation) and the number of inmates in its local correctional facility exceeds that capacity limit so that a county jail population emergency exists, the sheriff shall notify the presiding circuit judge, each municipal court judge and justice of the peace in the county, the district attorney for the county, the county counsel, the chief law enforcement officer for each city located in the county and the county court or board of commissioners that the number of inmates in the local correctional facility has exceeded capacity and that a county jail population emergency exists.
(2) If the county court or board has adopted a jail capacity limit and action plan under ORS 169.044 (Action on recommendation) and if a county jail population emergency occurs under the terms of the plan, the county court or board and the county sheriff may carry out the steps of the plan. This includes any authorization, under the plan, for the sheriff to order inmates released in order to reduce the jail population. A sheriff shall be immune from criminal or civil liability for any good faith release of inmates under ORS 169.042 (Maximum facility population) to 169.046 (Notice of county jail population emergency).
(3) If it becomes necessary to order inmates released under ORS 169.042 (Maximum facility population) to 169.046 (Notice of county jail population emergency), or if it appears to the sheriff that release of inmates is likely to become necessary in the near future, the sheriff shall immediately notify all police agencies in the county to make maximum use of citations in lieu of custody pursuant to ORS 133.055 (Criminal citation) to 133.076 (Failure to appear on criminal citation) until further notice.
(4) If it becomes necessary to order the release of inmates under ORS 169.042 (Maximum facility population) to 169.046 (Notice of county jail population emergency), the sheriff may place inmates on forced release subject to a forced release agreement. A forced release agreement must be in writing and be signed by the sheriff and the inmate and must include:
(a) The date of the next court appearance of the inmate;
(b) A statement that the inmate is required to appear at the next court appearance; and
(c) A statement that failure of the inmate to appear at the next court appearance is subject to prosecution under ORS 162.195 (Failure to appear in the second degree) or 162.205 (Failure to appear in the first degree). [1989 c.884 4,5,6; 1999 c.1051 71; 2001 c.517 2]
 
Annotations
Chapter 169
Law Review Citations
53 OLR 32 (1973)
 
1. Legislative Counsel Committee, CHAPTER 169—Local and Regional Correctional Facilities; Prisoners; Juvenile Facilities, https://-www.-oregonlegislature.-gov/-bills_laws/-lawsstatutes/-2013ors169.-html External_link_icon(2013) (last ac-cessed Apr. 27, 2014).
 
B.  Josephine County Court ORDER No. 2003-023  (later court orders on ratio deputies to inmates?)
    
C. Other Court Orders?
 
II. JAIL RATIO OF 1 DEPUTY TO 5 INMATES
 
See Above "JoCo Jail "Cap" Figures That Don’t Add Up" for jail ratio of 1 deputy to 5 inmates.
 
A. Old Antiquated Jail:  ???? - 2000
1.   Square Footage of Jail Space
2.   Safety Features
 
B. New State-of-the-Art Jail:  2000 - 2016
The current 262-bed Josephine County Jail was built in 2000 after voters approved a construction bond of nearly $13 million.  In March 2016 it was able to house 30 contract inmates and 100 local inmates (JO CO Sheriff's web site).
 
1.   Square Footage of Jail Space
2.   Safety Features
3.  Pods
 
C. Formulas
 
III. OREGON COUNTIES COMPARISON
     A. Staff/Inmate Ratios In Jails
     B. Jail Staffing Analysis
     C. Yamhill County (Oregon) Case Example
 
IV. STAFF/INMATE RATIOS IN JAILS (April 2015)
 
A. Staff/Inmate Ratios in Jails, National Institute Of Correction ( 2015)
 
Staff/Inmate Ratios in Jails (April 2015)
Tom Reid
National Institute Of Correction (NIC)
January 10, 2012
https://nic.zendesk.com/entries/20856343-Staff-Inmate-Ratios-in-Jails-April-2015-
 
Neither NIC nor the American Corrections Association in their accreditation standards support staff/inmate ratios as a measurement of adequate staffing, post coverage, or supervision of inmates.  NIC does not make any recommendations in terms of staff/inmate ratios.
 
The process for determining adequate staffing for a jail facility, and make it defensible, is to conduct a staffing analysis on a facility by facility basis.  There are simply too many variables such as physical plant design, level of security, level of programs and activities, state and local standard and statutes, etc. to recommend a specific officer to inmate ratio.
 
B. Other Staff/Inmate Ratio References
 
Security vs. Non-Security Filled Positions with Inmates to Staff Ratio (April 2015)
South Carolina Department of Corrections (SCDC), 2015
 
A Performance-Based Approach to Police Staffing and Allocation
Wilson, Jeremy M., and Alexander Weiss, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), 2014
 
Inmate to Security Ratio (July 1, 2008 and July 1, 2013)
South Carolina Department of Corrections (SCDC), 2013
 
Bureau of Prisons: Growing Inmate Crowding Negatively Affects Inmates, Staff, and Infrastructure
A Report to Congressional Requesters, United States Government Accountability Office (GAO), 2012
 
The Place of Punishment: Variation in the Provision of Inmate Services Staff Across the Punitive Turn [Article]
Phelps, Michelle S., 2012
 
An Examination of Pennsylvania's Rural County Prison Systems
Zajac, Gary, and Lindsay Kowalski, Pennsylvania State University, 2012
 
ASCA Responses: Staff to Inmate Ratio Survey (June 2010)
Association of State Correctional Administrators (ASCA), 2010
 
Census of State and Federal Correctional Facilities, 2005
Stephan, James J., Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), 2008
023330
 
JAIL STAFFING ANALYSIS RESOURCES
Staffing Analysis Clearinghouse [Website]
Community Resource Services (CRS, 2014)
025880
http://correction.org/staffing-analysis-clearinghouse
 
Prison Staffing Analysis: A Training Manual with Staffing Considerations for Special Populations
Camp, Camille Graham, Patricia L. Hardyman, Robert May, and George M. Camp, National Institute of Corrections (NIC), 2008
022667
 
Staffing Analysis Workbook for Jails
Liebert, Dennis R., and Rod Miller, National Institute of Corrections (NIC), 2003
016827
 
Staff/Inmate Ratios: Why It's So Hard to Get to the Bottom Line
Krauth, Barabara, Library Information Specialists, Inc., National Institute of Corrections Information Center (NICIC), 1988
007105
 
V.  JAIL STAFFING ANALYSIS
 
 
VI. OREGON SHERIFF JAIL COMMAND COUNCIL STATISTICS
 
A. Oregon Counties: FY 2006-07 - FY 2014-15
 
The following 2006 - 2014 Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council jail statistics have a wealth of information for counties in Oregon.
 
2006. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. 2006. Jail Statistics by County. Jail Beds, Admissions, Prison Commitments, Total Crime per 1,000 Population.
2007. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. 2007. Jail Statistics by County. Jail Beds, Admissions, Prison Commitments, Total Crime per 1,000 Population.
2008. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. 2008. Jail Statistics by County. Jail Beds, Admissions, Prison Commitments, Total Crime per 1,000 Population.
2009. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. 2009. Jail Statistics by County. Jail Beds, Admissions, Prison Commitments, Total Crime per 1,000 Population.
2010. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. 2010. Jail Statistics by County. Jail Beds, Admissions, Prison Commitments, Total Crime per 1,000 Population.
2011. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. 2011. Jail Statistics by County. Jail Beds, Admissions, Prison Commitments, Total Crime per 1,000 Population.
2012. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. 2012. Jail Statistics by County. Jail Beds, Admissions, Prison Commitments, Total Crime per 1,000 Population.
2013. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. 2013. Jail Statistics by County. Jail Beds, Admissions, Prison Commitments, Total Crime per 1,000 Population.
2014. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. 2014. Jail Statistics by County. Jail Beds, Admissions, Prison Commitments, Total Crime per 1,000 Population.
 
B. Josephine County, Oregon: FY 2006-07 - FY 2014-15
 
Table 1. Josephine County, Oregon Jail Statistics: General & Bookings. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. FY 2006-2007 Through FY 2014 - 2015 (i.e., County Population, Jail Budget, Bookings per 1,000 Population, Total Bookings, Male, Male %, Female, Female %, Juvenile, and Measure 11 Inmates).
 
Table 2. Josephine County, Oregon Jail Statistics: Releases & Corrections-System Beds. Oregon Sheriff's Jail Command Council. FY 2006-2007 Through FY 2014 - 2015 (i.e., # Inmates Posting Security, Total Security Posted, # of Forced Releases,  Beds in County,   Beds In Use,  Beds in Use Per 1,000 Population,. Beds Contracted in Other County, Beds Contracted by Other Agency, and  Total SB 1145 Inmates)
 
VII. ADULT JAIL
 
JOSEPHINE COUNTY ADULT JAIL, JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON ADOPTED BUDGET FY 2015-16
INTRODUCTION

The Josephine County's "Criminal Investigations & Related Sheriff's Office Support Services" web page covers all the 10 elements of the Josephine County Sheriff's Office identified in Josephine County's June 17, 2015 adopted budget, including the intent by the county to publish a supplemental "Public Safety Fund budget."

• Josephine County (JO CO) Board of County Commissioners (BCC). June 17, 2015. Josephine County, Oregon Adopted Budget FY 2015-16. JO CO BCC Resolution Number 2015-026. Grants Pass, OR.

The following two sections describe the Josephine County Jail public safety services (PSS) as of the county's June 17, 2015 adopted budget.

A.    Josephine County Public Safety Services
B.    Josephine County Jail, Josephine County, Oregon Adopted Budget: FY 2015-16

I. JOSEPHINE COUNTY PUBLIC SAFETY SERVICES

Public Safety Services
JS&PSS Exploratory Committee
Hugo Neighborhood Association & Historical Society
http://www.hugoneighborhood.org/pss.htm

The Josephine County Jail is one of six major public safety services identified in the last four county levies and the sales tax proposal (2012 - 2015). Locally they are usually considered to be the six major components of the JO CO public safety program.

Appendix 4B. Josephine County’s Minimally Adequate Level of Public Safety Services Standards, Section III.C. Components Of JO CO Public Safety Program For Increased Funding: 2012 - 2015
JS&PSS Exploratory Committee
Hugo Neighborhood Association & Historical Society
http://www.hugoneighborhood.org/malpss.htm

• Walker, Mike; Whalen, Jon, Members JS&PSS Exploratory Committee, Hugo Neighborhood Association & Historical Society. Very Draft December 15, 2015. Appendix 4B. JO CO’s Minimally Adequate Level of Public Safety Services (MALPSS) Standards, Including Law Enforcement Staffing & Deployment. Supporting Justice System & Public Safety Services Study Design: 2015. Hugo, OR.

1. Adult Jail
2. Juvenile Justice
3. District Attorney’s Office.
4. Sheriff Rural Patrol Deputies
5. Criminal Investigations & Related Sheriff’s Office Support Services
6. Animal Control/Protection

Other PSS

7. Adult Corrections

Josephine County Adult Jail
JS&PSS Exploratory Committee
Hugo Neighborhood Association & Historical Society
http://www.hugoneighborhood.org/pss.htm

B. JOSEPHINE COUNTY ADULT JAIL, JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON ADOPTED BUDGET FY 2015-16

• Josephine County (JO CO) Board of County Commissioners (BCC). June 17, 2015. Josephine County, Oregon Adopted Budget FY 2015-16. JO CO BCC Resolution Number 2015-026. Grants Pass, OR.


PUBLIC SAFETY FUND (PSF), JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON (PSF, pages 158/764 - 223/764)
PUBLIC SAFETY FUND DESCRIPTION (PSF, page 160/764)

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS AND BUDGETS:  SHERIFF'S OFFICE (PSF, pages 164/764 - 199/764)
1. Program: Administration (n/a)
2. Program: Emergency Services/Search and Rescue (n/a)
3. Program: Civil (n/a)
4. Program: Records (n/a)
5. Program: Dispatch (n/a)
6. Program: Patrol + Cave Junction (CJ) Patrol (n/a)
7. Program: Marine Patrol (n/a)
8. Program: Evidence & Property (n/a)
9. Program: Adult Jail
10. Program: Court Services (n/a)
11. Standards: Elective, Necessary, And/or Mandated Adult Jail (n/a)

• DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE (n/a; PSF, pages 200/764 - 216/764 )
• JUVENILE JUSTICE (n/a; PSF, pages 217/764 - 223/764 )
• PUBLIC HEALTH, JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON (n/a; PHF, pages 262/764 - 321/764)
Animal Protection and Regulation (PHF, pages 300/764 - 302/764)
• ADULT CORRECTIONS FUND (ACF), JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON (n/a; ACF, pages 224/764 - 261/764)

PUBLIC SAFETY FUND DESCRIPTION (PSF, page 160/764)

The Public Safety Fund was formed in 2006. It was comprised of three departments: Sheriff, District Attorney, and Community Justice, which had previously been in the General Fund. The Community Justice Department was further reorganized into Juvenile Justice and Adult Corrections. In 2007, Adult Corrections was moved to a separate fund. The Sheriff and District Attorney are elected officials. The manager of the Juvenile Justice Department reports to a liaison County Commissioner. The departments within this fund provide support for the criminal justice system utilized by city, county and state law enforcement. County wide services include court prosecution, civil services, the jail and juvenile facility.

The budget is in balance, which means that the budgeted requirements (expenditures and ending fund balance) are equal to the resources (beginning fund balance and revenues) that are estimated to be available during the budget year. The primary source of revenue to operate the departments in this Fund had been monies received under the Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP) and a transfer from the General Fund. Additionally, programs operated by the three departments generate revenues for specific program purposes. The TARP "county payments" money replaced the O&C distributions that the County received for many years.

A summary of the Public Safety Fund (Resources and Requirements) is presented first in the Josephine County, Oregon Adopted Budget FY 2015-16, followed by sections for each of the three departments. The money available for them is equal to total resources of the fund, less the requirement for Internal Service Fund charges. Major reductions in programs occurred in FY 2012-13 due to the loss of funding and five percent reductions have been occurring annually since.

For each department, there is a summary of its programs (Schedule A), which in turn is supported by a Program Worksheet (Schedule B) for each program. Schedule B provides information about the purpose of the program, how much revenue it is expected to generate during the budget year, and a breakdown of its expenditure budget by the categories specified in Oregon Local Budget Law.

Schedules C, D, and E provide details of resources, personal services and other expenditures, respectively.

9. Program: Adult Jail (PSF, page 193/764)
Fund: Public Safety Fund (12)
Office/Division: Sheriff
Cost Center #: 2965

Purpose of Program  Responsible for the incarceration of offenders in a humane, professional, sound manner as well as providing for safe and secure operations. This includes protecting the public from escape risks, protecting jail staff, contractors, and inmates from exposure to violence to the extent possible within budgetary constraints.

• ORS 206.010. Arrest and commit to prison all person who break the peace, or attempt to break it, and all persons guilty of publilc offenses.
• ORS 169.320. The County must pay for the care of county prisoners. The Sheriff has custody and control of prisoners in the facility.

Standards: Elective, Necessary, And/or Mandated Adult Jail

a) Oregon Revised Statues

(9) Program: Adult Jail
• ORS 206.010. Arrest and commit to prison all person who break the peace, or attempt to break it, and all persons guilty of publilc offenses.
• ORS 169.320. The County must pay for the care of county prisoners. The Sheriff has custody and control of prisoners in the facility.

b) Oregon Administrative Rules

???

c) Josephine County Policy/Law

VIII. RESOURCES
 
A. Professional Resources
 
1. Oregon State Sheriff's Association (OSSA)
2. Prison Rape Elimination Act Center (PREA)
        
B. Studies/Papers
 
1. Jackson County, Oregon Special Corrections Grand Jury Reports
Jackson County District Attorney
http://jacksoncountyor.org/da/General/Special-Corrections-Grand-Jury-Reports
 
Oregon Revised Statutes requires that at least once yearly, a grand jury shall inquire into the condition and management of every correctional facility and youth correction facility in the county.
 
Each year witnesses are called before the grand jury who represent a wide range of individuals whose lives and careers are affected by the operations of corrections in our community. They include government and political leaders, defense counsel, inmates, supervisory authority personnel and correction employees. The observations, conclusions and recommendations of the grand jury's annual report are based upon the testimony of these witnesses, from the facts and figures they provided, and from observations of the grand jury as it tours the county's correctional facilities.
Three correctional facilities are operated within Jackson County. Two of those facilities are under the supervision of the county sheriff; the third is a juvenile detention facility which is operated by the Department of Community Corrections.
 
2014 Special Corrections Grand Jury Report
• Jackson County Special Corrections Grand Jury. 6/8/2015. 2014 Special Corrections Grand Jury Report. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office, Jackson County, Oregon. Medford, OR.
2013 Special Corrections Grand Jury Report
• Jackson County Special Corrections Grand Jury. 12/8/2014. 2013 Special Corrections Grand Jury Report. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office, Jackson County, Oregon. Medford, OR.
2012 Special Corrections Grand Jury Report
• Jackson County Special Corrections Grand Jury. 12/8/2014. 2012 Special Corrections Grand Jury Report. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office, Jackson County, Oregon. Medford, OR.
2012 Grand Jury Corrections Response
• Jackson County Special Corrections Grand Jury. 12/8/2014. 2012 Special Corrections Grand Jury Response. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office, Jackson County, Oregon. Medford, OR.
2011 Special Corrections Grand Jury
• Jackson County Special Corrections Grand Jury. 12/8/2014. 2011 Special Corrections Grand Jury. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office, Jackson County, Oregon. Medford, OR.
2010 Special Corrections Grand Jury
• Jackson County Special Corrections Grand Jury. 12/8/2014. 2010 Special Corrections Grand Jury. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office, Jackson County, Oregon. Medford, OR.
2009 Special Corrections Grand Jury
• Jackson County Special Corrections Grand Jury. 12/8/2014. 2009 Special Corrections Grand Jury. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office, Jackson County, Oregon. Medford, OR.
2008 Special Corrections Grand Jury
• Jackson County Special Corrections Grand Jury. 12/8/2014. 2008 Special Corrections Grand Jury. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office, Jackson County, Oregon. Medford, OR.
 
2. Executive Office of the President of the United States
 
2016 Economic Perspectives on Incarceration and the Criminal Justice System
Executive Office of the President of the United States. April 2016. Economic Perspectives on Incarceration and the Criminal Justice System. White House Council of Economic Advisors (CEA). Washington, D.C.